What Does Klonopin Do?

Klonopin, also known by its generic name clonazepam, is a benzodiazepine approved by the Federal Food and Drug Administration to treat panic disorders. It is also used to treat specific types of seizure disorders, including Epilepsy. Klonopin is classified as a benzodiazepine which means the side effects of taking Klonopin mirror those of other benzodiazepine drugs. 

 

Klonopin Defined

Klonopin is a prescription benzodiazepine used in the mental health setting to treat symptoms associated with panic disorders. Because Klonopin is a benzodiazepine, it may sometimes be used as part of some addiction treatment programs to treat detox and alcohol withdrawal difficulties. Depending on the individual, anxiety, panic attacks, and problems sleeping are often attributed to alcohol withdrawal. In some medically assisted detox programs, benzodiazepine drugs like Klonopin are used to reduce the intensity of some symptoms. 

 

What Does Klonopin Do?

As previously mentioned, Klonopin is a benzodiazepine used to prevent and control seizures and panic attacks. Klonopin works by calming the brain and nerves reducing the severity and intensity of seizure activity. Benzodiazepine drugs like Klonopin are often referred to as sedatives or tranquilizers because they have a calming and sedating effect on the user. Other common benzodiazepines include Xanax, Valium, and Ativan.

 

When used to treat panic disorders, Klonopin works on specific neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. The neurotransmitters affected by Klonopin are those responsible for regulating functions such as sleep, excitement, relaxation, and anxiety. Klonopin slows down the activity of the central nervous system and decreases nervousness and agitation while bringing about a sense of calm and relaxation. Unfortunately, the effects of Klonopin occur shortly after the use and are typically short-lasting. Therefore, it is often necessary to take Klonopin multiple times a day to continue controlling symptoms of anxiety and panic. For some, this can lead to tolerance, dependency, and addiction.

 

Is Klonopin Addictive? 

All benzodiazepines, including Klonopin, are classified as controlled substances. Controlled substances are those which carry a high risk of both physical and emotional dependency, as well as an increased risk of abuse. If someone develops a dependence on Klonopin, it can become overwhelmingly difficult to discontinue use without seeking support and guidance from an addiction treatment center. Often, when someone who is dependent on Klonopin tries to reduce or stop using, they will experience withdrawal symptoms. The most common withdrawal symptoms include anxiety, tremors, seizures, vomiting, irritability, and aggressive behavior.

 

It is also vital to communicate with your medical or mental health provider if you are taking other prescription drugs (especially opioids) or if you struggle with an addiction to alcohol. Combining benzodiazepines with opioids or alcohol can sometimes lead to severe, dangerous, even fatal reactions. The sedative effects of opioids and benzodiazepines combined can lead to uncontrolled sedation, reduced respiratory rate, coma, and death. Mixing Klonopin and alcohol is also highly dangerous as both substances act as central nervous system depressants. When multiple drugs work together to suppress the activity of the central nervous system, it can lead to difficulties with breathing and heart rate. In severe cases, it can lead to coma, long-term health effects, and death. 

 

Reach Out to Rise in Malibu Today

If you or a loved one struggles with an addiction to Klonopin or are taking Klonopin with other drugs like alcohol or opioids, it is vital to seek treatment. Withdrawing from opioids, alcohol, or benzodiazepines without the support of medically-assisted detox at an addiction treatment center like Rise in Malibu can be dangerous and even life-threatening. At Rise in Malibu, our treatment team can help you get started on your journey to overcome dependency on Klonopin in a safe, healthy way. To learn more about our Luxury Malibu rehab, contact our admissions team today. 

 

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